Epic Games Educational Spotlight – Gnomon School of Visual Effects, Games + Animation

School: Gnomon School of Visual Effects, Games + Animation
Department: Games 

Program Description:

For over twenty years, Gnomon has educated many of the world’s best digital artists. Called “the MIT of visual effects” by Fast Company magazine, Gnomon offers a variety of educational options to help students reach their goals in the entertainment industry, with both degree and vocational certificate programs, specialized courses for high school students and over 100 individual courses for professional enrichment.

Visual effects artists launched Gnomon with the support of the entertainment industry to help meet the demand for well-trained creative talent in the growing field of digital entertainment. Gnomon’s graduates are professionals working on the latest blockbuster films and games, and have positions at film and video game studios around the world.

The games curriculum combines Gnomon’s one-of-a-kind core digital production education with an emphasis on game art, design, and tools.

With a balance of design education and software-based technical training, Gnomon’s games courses offers students an extensive and in-depth skill set relevant to the demands of the industry.      

 

Instructor Spotlight:

Featured Educator – Anton Napierala – Anton has an extensive background as a Maya artist, with clientele including Disney, Mattel, MTV, and Miramax. As a senior environment artist on Sony’s first-party game Major League Baseball, Anton was responsible for creating game assets, training and mentoring team artists, and aiding in developing pipeline and procedures. He brings a wealth of experience in games development to his classes at Gnomon.

Featured EducatorNick Reynolds – Nick has extensive experience in video game development as an environment artist. He balances creative drive with organization and discipline, which has made him a sought-after artist in the field. Nick brings these skills to his instruction here at Gnomon.

 

Student Spotlight:

Individual Student Work  Julian Elwood – Although Julian is very tech-oriented with his game art skills, he’s also a very talented artist with a great eye for both realistic and stylized artwork. He is the president of the Gnomon Games Club. Julian recently placed in Blizzard’s Student Environment Art Competition with his Unreal based stylized “Haunted Chicken Coop” 

“Julian is extremely talented, and I can’t wait to see what types of professional projects he works on,” said Anton Napierala

Looking Glass from wssszsss on Vimeo.

Group Student WorkLooking Glass – In Anton’s level design class, a group of students as part of their final project, put together a VR experience, “Looking Glass,” in Unreal Engine. Players travel back and forth between the real world and a dark and twisted mirror world, as they attempt to escape from a haunted bathroom. They built everything within four weeks.

Core Team members:

Game Design & Blueprint – Josh Rose

Texturing & Modeling & Lighting – Mido Lai, Rico Suyang Wang

Instructor – Anton Napierala

Sound effects – Jin S. Wong

External Talent:

Music – ‘Dead Inside’ By Beatowski Beats

Gnomon is committed to being on the cutting edge with industry software and trends, which is why they teach Unreal Engine as their premiere engine in Games Creation courses. There are too many amazing student projects to share within one article, so you are invited to view their Student Showcase at www.gnomon.edu/showcase.

Following the Trace of Alien Civilization in Relic Seeker: Hypogeum

Relic Seeker: Hypogeum is a puzzle adventure game about an archaeologist`s journey to discover the secrets of an ancient civilization. Players take on the role of the archaeologist as they explore ancient ruins, discover the trace of aliens who intervened in pre-civilization earth and solve puzzles that block their progress.

The project is a VR game developed by the three-artist team at Massive Wheel in Korea. We caught up Massive Wheel to find out more about the ways in which UE4 has enabled this small, artist-only team to bring this game to life on multiple platforms with stunning graphic quality.
 

Before we discuss the game, please tell us about Massive Wheel.

Massive Wheel is team of three artists who all have solid experience in major online game studios. Three of us not only worked on game design and art, but also coding and planning, and even sound was worked on by our team with the source purchased from the Unreal Engine Marketplace. Relic Seeker: Hypogeum has been published as our first work on the Google Daydream and Oculus Gear VR platforms and we are currently preparing to release it on Steam VR, Android and IOS within the year.

How did you began the Relic Seeker: Hypogeum project?

Like many other Korean developers, we started our career from major PC  games, especially MMORPG. After gaining considerable career experience however, we were trying to make something fresh. It was then that the idea of a 3D puzzle adventure game on mobile came to mind. Not only because the genre is pretty uncommon and all of us like it, but we also thought the genre could reflect us overcoming the many challenges from several fields in development. 

After revealing the development build on SNS and at BIC Fest (Busan Indie Connect Festival), we had gathered a lot of user feedback suggesting that Relic Seeker would be more fitting for VR, so we began VR development in earnest after considering the possibilities along with our capabilities.

The result was successful. Many people from Korea and Japan came to enjoy our game at several conferences, and although it was quite difficult to spend a long time on just one game, many players experienced the whole 30 minute playtime limit. These sessions were very valuable as we applied user feedback as much as possible to make a highly immersive mobile VR game with great graphical quality.

The game’s spaces are scarcely duplicated, rather various kind of stages composed of many puzzle objects and unique structures appears continuously. Was this scale of work a problem for the team considering there are only three members?

The three of us are all capable of 3D modeling, which helped, but one of our strengths on the project was to push the limits of our own ability. Of course the progress was quite bumpy as there were no prior project data to inform how much scale is appropriate or how much detail could be shown for mobile platforms, but we have gathered the necessary data as we developed thousands of designs and modeling on our own. Ultimately,  we have been able to implement a variety of detailed and distinctive spaces and structures in the game as a result.

Why did you choose Unreal Engine 4?

Two major advantages from us were graphical quality and Blueprint visual scripting. All of us were artists and lacked experience programming games, so we prioritized the possibility of implementation for great quality of graphics as we want, without advanced programming discipline. In fact, we began development with a different engine, but with UE4’s Blueprint visual scripting system, which supports those with no programming experience, and better graphical performance in the same environment, it was really worth transitioning from Unity to Unreal.

For example, optimization was one of the most difficult parts of development, but we reduced lots of draw calls using HLOD and Precomputed Visibility, which both are parts of Unreal Engine`s utility, and could get a significant performance improvement with Multi-view. Even after that, we could decrease more draw calls with Blueprint. UE4 gave us great satisfaction and helped us achieve our goals for the project. 

Relic Seeker: Hypogeum has been developed with only Unreal Engine’s Blueprint. Is there any special reason for that?

Yes! Because we could implement all the functionalities we wanted with Blueprint while C++ native coding was not familiar to us. Blueprint has both intuitiveness and utility, making it possible for us to create puzzles and in fact the entire game with Blueprint. We were able to ship Relic Seeker: Hypogeum on Google Daydream and Gear VR without authoring a single line of code.  

Any other benefit of the engine which particularly helped the development?

Immediate and ongoing engine updates were impressive. New technologies are constantly introduced to VR, and every time the SDK would be newly updated for each platform. And Unreal Engine has been rapidly updated for the situation. It has significantly influenced optimization and quality of the game. 

Also in multi-platform response, Unreal Engine significantly helped a small team like us. We developed the Daydream version first and worked the Gear VR version based on it, but further (Engine) optimization has been added during the development. So we decided to implement the optimization to the Daydream version, and the progress required less than a few hours. It is a huge advantage in terms of having to launch and maintain games on multiple platforms.

What advice would you give to independent developers who want to use Unreal in the future?

I think It is vital for indie developers to expose their games to various platforms. So you should place priority on whether you can cope with several platforms with minimum members without many problems. Unreal Engine would be excellent choice in that aspect.

We have one rule when we work considering multi-platform, which is our primary way to work with UE binary version as much as possible, and update it immediately when every new version has been released. So that we can maintain the latest release version and reduce the amount of adjustment for each platform when we convert to the other platforms after that. 

Sometimes developers from non-programming backgrounds who are considering Unreal Engine begin to question whether they could make the game they were planning only with Blueprint, and just give up even before the start. I would like to inform you that Blueprints is more powerful than you may think as we have created a game with high-quality graphics using only Blueprint.

Where can people go for more information on Relic Seeker: Hypogeum and your team?

You can find Daydream version and GearVR version of the game from each markets, and check out our Facebook if you would like to follow our updates.

Following the Trace of Alien Civilization in Relic Seeker: Hypogeum

Relic Seeker: Hypogeum is a puzzle adventure game about an archaeologist`s journey to discover the secrets of an ancient civilization. Players take on the role of the archaeologist as they explore ancient ruins, discover the trace of aliens who intervened in pre-civilization earth and solve puzzles that block their progress.

The project is a VR game developed by the three-artist team at Massive Wheel in Korea. We caught up Massive Wheel to find out more about the ways in which UE4 has enabled this small, artist-only team to bring this game to life on multiple platforms with stunning graphic quality.
 

Before we discuss the game, please tell us about Massive Wheel.

Massive Wheel is team of three artists who all have solid experience in major online game studios. Three of us not only worked on game design and art, but also coding and planning, and even sound was worked on by our team with the source purchased from the Unreal Engine Marketplace. Relic Seeker: Hypogeum has been published as our first work on the Google Daydream and Oculus Gear VR platforms and we are currently preparing to release it on Steam VR, Android and IOS within the year.

How did you began the Relic Seeker: Hypogeum project?

Like many other Korean developers, we started our career from major PC  games, especially MMORPG. After gaining considerable career experience however, we were trying to make something fresh. It was then that the idea of a 3D puzzle adventure game on mobile came to mind. Not only because the genre is pretty uncommon and all of us like it, but we also thought the genre could reflect us overcoming the many challenges from several fields in development. 

After revealing the development build on SNS and at BIC Fest (Busan Indie Connect Festival), we had gathered a lot of user feedback suggesting that Relic Seeker would be more fitting for VR, so we began VR development in earnest after considering the possibilities along with our capabilities.

The result was successful. Many people from Korea and Japan came to enjoy our game at several conferences, and although it was quite difficult to spend a long time on just one game, many players experienced the whole 30 minute playtime limit. These sessions were very valuable as we applied user feedback as much as possible to make a highly immersive mobile VR game with great graphical quality.

The game’s spaces are scarcely duplicated, rather various kind of stages composed of many puzzle objects and unique structures appears continuously. Was this scale of work a problem for the team considering there are only three members?

The three of us are all capable of 3D modeling, which helped, but one of our strengths on the project was to push the limits of our own ability. Of course the progress was quite bumpy as there were no prior project data to inform how much scale is appropriate or how much detail could be shown for mobile platforms, but we have gathered the necessary data as we developed thousands of designs and modeling on our own. Ultimately,  we have been able to implement a variety of detailed and distinctive spaces and structures in the game as a result.

Why did you choose Unreal Engine 4?

Two major advantages from us were graphical quality and Blueprint visual scripting. All of us were artists and lacked experience programming games, so we prioritized the possibility of implementation for great quality of graphics as we want, without advanced programming discipline. In fact, we began development with a different engine, but with UE4’s Blueprint visual scripting system, which supports those with no programming experience, and better graphical performance in the same environment, it was really worth transitioning from Unity to Unreal.

For example, optimization was one of the most difficult parts of development, but we reduced lots of draw calls using HLOD and Precomputed Visibility, which both are parts of Unreal Engine`s utility, and could get a significant performance improvement with Multi-view. Even after that, we could decrease more draw calls with Blueprint. UE4 gave us great satisfaction and helped us achieve our goals for the project. 

Relic Seeker: Hypogeum has been developed with only Unreal Engine’s Blueprint. Is there any special reason for that?

Yes! Because we could implement all the functionalities we wanted with Blueprint while C++ native coding was not familiar to us. Blueprint has both intuitiveness and utility, making it possible for us to create puzzles and in fact the entire game with Blueprint. We were able to ship Relic Seeker: Hypogeum on Google Daydream and Gear VR without authoring a single line of code.  

Any other benefit of the engine which particularly helped the development?

Immediate and ongoing engine updates were impressive. New technologies are constantly introduced to VR, and every time the SDK would be newly updated for each platform. And Unreal Engine has been rapidly updated for the situation. It has significantly influenced optimization and quality of the game. 

Also in multi-platform response, Unreal Engine significantly helped a small team like us. We developed the Daydream version first and worked the Gear VR version based on it, but further (Engine) optimization has been added during the development. So we decided to implement the optimization to the Daydream version, and the progress required less than a few hours. It is a huge advantage in terms of having to launch and maintain games on multiple platforms.

What advice would you give to independent developers who want to use Unreal in the future?

I think It is vital for indie developers to expose their games to various platforms. So you should place priority on whether you can cope with several platforms with minimum members without many problems. Unreal Engine would be excellent choice in that aspect.

We have one rule when we work considering multi-platform, which is our primary way to work with UE binary version as much as possible, and update it immediately when every new version has been released. So that we can maintain the latest release version and reduce the amount of adjustment for each platform when we convert to the other platforms after that. 

Sometimes developers from non-programming backgrounds who are considering Unreal Engine begin to question whether they could make the game they were planning only with Blueprint, and just give up even before the start. I would like to inform you that Blueprints is more powerful than you may think as we have created a game with high-quality graphics using only Blueprint.

Where can people go for more information on Relic Seeker: Hypogeum and your team?

You can find Daydream version and GearVR version of the game from each markets, and check out our Facebook if you would like to follow our updates.

These Unreal Engine Games Powered PAX East 2018

PAX East 2018 is now a thing of the past and the sold-out show on Summer Street in Boston provided plenty of opportunities to experience games made by the worldwide Unreal Engine community.

From all-new demos of highly-anticipated titles like Ashes of Creation to a bustling Bandai Namco booth featuring Code Vein, Soulcalibur VI and Naruto to Boruto: Shinbobi Striker (which you can see here) and outstanding Indie experiences such as Golem Gates and Amid Evil (below), the expo floor was jam-packed with UE-powered titles for showgoers to explore.

Golem Gates is at #PAXEast! Booth 14079. Stop by and win a copy of the game! #steam @IndieMEGABOOTH pic.twitter.com/Hb7Tr1JXRf

— Golem Gates (@GolemGates) April 6, 2018

These #UE4 graphics are like way too lifelike.

Come see for yourself at #PAXEast 😎https://t.co/IFWOYpq7Xx pic.twitter.com/AVyHjYC1Wg

— INDEFATIGABLE (@IndefatigableNZ) April 6, 2018

We’re proud of the teams that showcased their titles during PAX East 2018 and encourage you to check them out below!

UNREAL ENGINE GAMES AT PAX EAST 2018

Amid Evil
Ashen
Ashes of Creation
City of Brass
Close to the Sun
Code Vein
Dauntless
Dead by Daylight
Death Garden
Decoherence
Dreadnought
Extinction
Fortnite
Foxhole
Gears of War 4
Genesis Alpha One
Golem Gates
Gravel
Grip
Hello Neighbor
Hyper Jam
Killing Floor: Incursion
Last Year: The Nightmare
Lost Ember
Mothergunship
Mowin’ & Throwin’
Naruto to Boruto: Shinobu Striker
Omen of Sorrow
Omensight
Outpost Zero
Planet Alpha
PLAYERUNKNOWN’S Battlegrounds
Q.U.B.E. 2
Rite of Ilk
Rocket League
Rhythm of the Universe
Rune
SCUM
Sea of Thieves
Shape of the World
Sinner: Sacrifice for Redemption
Sleep Tight
Smash Up
Soulcalibur VI
State of Decay 2
Supercross
The Darwin Project
The Forge Arena
The Protagonist
Tiny Metal
Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes
What Remains of Edith Finch
Wormhole Wars

Epic Games Educational Spotlight – Gnomon School of Visual Effects, Games + Animation

School: Gnomon School of Visual Effects, Games + Animation
Department: Games 

Program Description:

For over twenty years, Gnomon has educated many of the world’s best digital artists. Called “the MIT of visual effects” by Fast Company magazine, Gnomon offers a variety of educational options to help students reach their goals in the entertainment industry, with both degree and vocational certificate programs, specialized courses for high school students and over 100 individual courses for professional enrichment.

Visual effects artists launched Gnomon with the support of the entertainment industry to help meet the demand for well-trained creative talent in the growing field of digital entertainment. Gnomon’s graduates are professionals working on the latest blockbuster films and games, and have positions at film and video game studios around the world.

The games curriculum combines Gnomon’s one-of-a-kind core digital production education with an emphasis on game art, design, and tools.

With a balance of design education and software-based technical training, Gnomon’s games courses offers students an extensive and in-depth skill set relevant to the demands of the industry.      

 

Instructor Spotlight:

Featured Educator – Anton Napierala – Anton has an extensive background as a Maya artist, with clientele including Disney, Mattel, MTV, and Miramax. As a senior environment artist on Sony’s first-party game Major League Baseball, Anton was responsible for creating game assets, training and mentoring team artists, and aiding in developing pipeline and procedures. He brings a wealth of experience in games development to his classes at Gnomon.

Featured EducatorNick Reynolds – Nick has extensive experience in video game development as an environment artist. He balances creative drive with organization and discipline, which has made him a sought-after artist in the field. Nick brings these skills to his instruction here at Gnomon.

 

Student Spotlight:

Individual Student Work  Julian Elwood – Although Julian is very tech-oriented with his game art skills, he’s also a very talented artist with a great eye for both realistic and stylized artwork. He is the president of the Gnomon Games Club. Julian recently placed in Blizzard’s Student Environment Art Competition with his Unreal based stylized “Haunted Chicken Coop” 

“Julian is extremely talented, and I can’t wait to see what types of professional projects he works on,” said Anton Napierala

Looking Glass from wssszsss on Vimeo.

Group Student WorkLooking Glass – In Anton’s level design class, a group of students as part of their final project, put together a VR experience, “Looking Glass,” in Unreal Engine. Players travel back and forth between the real world and a dark and twisted mirror world, as they attempt to escape from a haunted bathroom. They built everything within four weeks.

Core Team members:

Game Design & Blueprint – Josh Rose

Texturing & Modeling & Lighting – Mido Lai, Rico Suyang Wang

Instructor – Anton Napierala

Sound effects – Jin S. Wong

External Talent:

Music – ‘Dead Inside’ By Beatowski Beats

Gnomon is committed to being on the cutting edge with industry software and trends, which is why they teach Unreal Engine as their premiere engine in Games Creation courses. There are too many amazing student projects to share within one article, so you are invited to view their Student Showcase at www.gnomon.edu/showcase.

Unreal Engine Brings High-Fidelity Real-Time Graphics to Broadcaster Platforms

Epic Games’ Unreal Engine latest 4.19 release will be showcased at the NAB Conference in Las Vegas, NV, April 9-12. Unreal Engine is being leveraged to enable high-fidelity real-time performance in broadcast production workflows for weather, episodic p…

The Weather Channel Taps The Future Group To Provide Revolutionary Mixed-Reality Capabilities

The Weather Group and The Future Group announced today a new partnership to help ignite the next evolution of weather presentation through new, immersive mixed-reality technology. With this innovative partnership, The Weather Channel will continue to p…

Iron Galaxy Brings its Fighting Game Expertise to the Fantasy World of Extinction

Extinction. The elimination of a species from existence. In Iron Galaxy’s upcoming Extinction, humanity is on the endangered species list as they struggle to survive against the enormous and bloodthirsty Ravenii. Their last line of defense is a solitary warrior, a Sentinel named Avil who accepts the weight onto his shoulders with a solemn conviction. This will not be humanity’s last stand.

Iron Galaxy has long been a force in the industry working on a multitude of ports over the years but really came into their own when they began creating and publishing their own titles. Perhaps their most notable project has been Killer Instinct on Xbox One, which is held in very high regard among the fighting game community.

Using their knowledge of nimble controls and fast-as-lightning reaction time, they bring many of those core fighting game mechanics to Extinction. Players are rewarded for their skills as they progress through the game with ever increasing challenges awaiting them at every turn.

So, what will it take to survive against the Ravenii and how did the team at Iron Galaxy use Unreal Engine 4 to bring their vision into reality? We chat with five members of the dev team to talk severing ogre limbs and bringing this fully destructible world to life.

How did the experience of the Iron Galaxy team benefit in the development of Extinction? Does the strong background in fighting games (ie: Killer Instinct) show its fingerprints in Extinction’s gameplay? 

Kurt Tillmanns, Lead Designer: Our work on previous action titles aided us a lot and our collective taste in fast, skill-based games is prevalent in decisions we made while designing Extinction. As developers, it’s important to build on those experiences because you can hone your existing skill set while also taking on new challenges, and Extinction provided a lot of brand new challenges for us. Unlike other games with large enemies, there is no golden path to defeating the Ravenii. The player can approach them from any angle, any limb. The Ravenii have to be able to react to every one of those player decisions and pose a threat at a fast pace that we haven’t seen against enemies of this size.

Where did the idea for Extinction originate? Can you tell us about any other games that inspired you on this title? 

Kraig Kujawa, Executive Producer: The initial ‘David vs Goliath’ idea and fiction came from our initial discussions with Maximum Games, who are huge fans of fighting games, just like we are. We were inspired, obviously, by the scale of Shadow of the Colossus and Attack on Titan, but our combat is inspired by fighting games. Thru Divekick, Killer Instinct, and our Midway Games background, that’s our heritage. We were fascinated by trying to mesh the two into something cool.

Extinction has an interesting background story leading up to when the game takes place. Tell us a bit about the history that leads humankind to such devastation.

Derek Neal, Executive Producer: The Ravenii are an old threat, long since thought vanquished, that have since resurfaced. In times long ago, the order of people who originally drove the Ravenii away was known as the Sentinels. However, in the absence of the threat, the Sentinel order slowly faded away, and mankind forgot their ancient enemy. Kingdoms rose and fell, and instead of fighting monsters, people began fighting each other. This created a bloody and war-torn world, which was ill-equipped for the Ravenii’s return.

Avil is the last of the Sentinels, the last line of defense against the Ravenii; How did he get here? How is he the last of his kind?

Derek Neal, Executive Producer: Avil was originally a human soldier, but he was captured and forced into a slave camp. He is freed when the Ravenii attack the country that was holding him, shattering the slave camp in the process. Instead of running, he is one of the few that takes up arms to fight. This doesn’t go well, but thankfully he is saved by a mysterious figure, who takes him in and begins teaching him the lost arts.

The combat in Extinction is highly skill based. Were you able to find a balance between difficulty and ease of play for more casual or less skilled players?

Kurt Tillmanns, Lead Designer: We did a lot of playtesting to find the right balance between accessibility and skill and we’re proud of the end result. If you challenge people in just the right way, they understand that there is depth to your game and are driven forward by the promise of mastering that depth, but if you don’t challenge people enough they get bored. Extinction’s combat is skill based, but it’s also about the decisions the player makes in-between those combat moments – whether to defend the city from an oncoming Ravenii, save a group of civilians, or take out the nearest horde of Jackals. As players get better at mastering the combat, these strategic decisions carry more weight.

Traversal is the name of the game in Extinction with Avil being able to scale buildings (and Ravenii!) almost at will. How did the Unreal Engine help you refine such a high speed and intricate mechanic?

Kraig Kujawa, Executive Producer: We love Unreal Engine. Many of us at Iron Galaxy have worked on versions of Unreal Engine for 15 years or more, and I got started making mods for Unreal Engine 2. Having a team with expertise in Unreal gives us a shared knowledge base and a shared tool base that eliminates the need to solve some very complex problems when developing a full-featured game like Extinction. It allows us to focus on making the game fun!

Extinction boasts a fully destructible environment. How challenging was it to make all that chaos work together in-game?

Kraig Kujawa, Executive Producer: It wasn’t as much of a challenge as you might think because destructible environments was something we knew we wanted very early on in development. It was also one of the very first features we implemented in the game so the team was used to developing missions, challenges and AI around all the destruction.

Extinction was revealed just before E3 2017. Since that time have you received any feedback from fans based on what they’ve seen? Did you use any of that feedback to change the game going further? 

Kraig Kujawa, Executive Producer: The feedback was amazing and the team was ecstatic to see their hard work so widely appreciated. Fan feedback is crucial for letting us know if we are on the right track. Once we saw that the work we showed got a great response, we were excited to make sure all of the features we didn’t show would make people just as excited!

What was your main motivation for choosing Unreal Engine 4 as the platform for Extinction?  

Mike O’Connor, Lead Engineer: Familiarity was a huge deal. Many of the team members have extensive prior experience with Unreal Engine 3 and have used Unreal Engine 4 in both internal prototypes and personal projects prior to Extinction. That level of experience allowed us to start prototyping features right away, without having to spend too much time learning our way around.

Tell us about a favorite tool or feature of Unreal Engine 4 and how it aided you in development.

Kurt Tillmanns, Lead Designer: There are so many to choose from! Blueprint has been a huge addition to the engine that has empowered our content team to take ownership of features in ways they couldn’t before and take some of that overhead off of engineering, who get more time to work on our “larger scale” features.

Lars De Vore, Lead Artist: The main player’s state machine allowed our animation and design teams easily prototype new moves and quickly iterate on how they worked together.

Where can people go to find out more about Extinction?

People can check us out at www.extinction.com or feel free to hit us up on Twitter (@IToTheG)! Also be sure to check out the game’s official Steam Page!